FAQs

How long do we have to walk each day?

All our trekking programs are classified into THREE different categories according to the level of difficulty. Soft Adventure treks are only about a week to 10 days in duration. These generally don't go above 4000 meters and each day, you can expect to be walking for around 4 – 5 hours. Moderate to fairly challenging treks are longer treks that go right into high mountain country. Physically quite tiring, these involve approx 6-8 hours trekking along rocky ridges of high Himalayan peaks. Strenuous treks are longer treks that go far further than the normal haunts of trekkers and tourists. Physically challenging, these may involve 7-9 hours trekking and likely to include unfavorable weather conditions and strenuous activities. It’s definitely not for beginners.

Is there any communication while we are on trekking?

There are telephones & mobile service in trekking routes and internet service in Everest, Annapurna and Lang tang areas.

Can I re-charge camera & mobile batteries along the trek?

Yes, in most of the places, you can charge batteries along the trek.

What about water - are they available at each teahouse?

You can buy mineral water, boiled water or filter water during the trekking. We recommend you to bring water purification pills. On the trail, water from the streams is safe if away from settlements.

What happens if there is an emergency?

All of our guides are trained in basic first aid and can deal with the basic ailments that may occur on trek. In the event of an emergency Unique Path trekking will cover initial expenses of any rescue operation. It is a condition of booking that you yourself are adequately insured for such an event as these expenses will need to be recovered from your insurance company. In the more frequented regions there are health posts, which have been established by foreign doctors and many are staffed by overseas personnel. 

Are the trekking staffs insured?

Our company insures all our trekking staff, including guides, cooks, sherpas and porters.

Could you give us some information about the guide?

All of our guides are highly skilled professionals who have been selected based on their technical proficiency, proven safety records, careful judgment, patient and supportive teaching styles and great personalities. Our guides are trained by the Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Ministry of Tourism and at the High Altitude Medical Training Center. Our guides are very experienced in dealing with the effects of higher altitudes and since they are natives of Nepal, they easily acclimatize and therefore can better care for their clients. They are equipped with necessary medical supplies and can assist you with basic first aid treatment.

Can the guides speak English?

The cultural tour guides are quite proficient in English. The trekking guide (Sirdar) and his assistants speak reasonable amount of English, good enough to explain you about the places, local culture or any sight that catches your eyes. If required, we can also provide different language guides with an additional cost.

How big are the groups?

We try to bring together a small group of likeminded people to give them a memorable and insightful travel experience, coupled with an invaluable opportunity to interact with each other in a fun-filled environment. Our travel group generally comprises of maximum 12 members.

We need a minimum of 2 participants to run our fixed departure dates. For private trips, no minimum and maximum participants apply.

Do you arrange private treks?

Yes, we do. If you would like to travel independently, or with your friends, families & colleagues you are invited to choose any of the trips at your convenient time frame for any number of people (minimum 1 & maximum 100 at a time). Cost for private trip is fixed on the basis of group size, trek area, duration and trek style, and is negotiable. If none of our fixed group departure dates work for you and you do not have anyone to accompany you, you can still be able to make your preferred trip with us. We assign local guide, porters etc who are trustworthy and experienced.

What about security during trekking?

We give high importance to the security of our clients. All our guides and other support crew are carefully chosen for your trips. Our guides hold licenses issued by the Government of Nepal. They are very honest and reliable. But we would also advise you to take care of your own personal belongings. If you are on ‘camping trek’ please do not leave your bags unattended at any time for your own safety. Take your main bag inside the tent once you reach campsite. At night, put all bags and belongings in the middle of the tent. Your guide assigns a Sherpa on turn-wise basis to guard the campsite throughout the night. If you are on ‘Tea house or GAP trek’ arrangement, you will be sleeping in local tea house. You have to take sensible precautions yourself at all times. Never leave your baggage unattended and keep your lodge room locked when you go out.

How fit do I need to be to trek in the Himalayas?

You should be moderately fit, used to some regular exercise and enjoy walking in the high altitude conditions.

What about AMS (Acute Mountain Sickness)?

Yes, it is certain that if you rapidly gain height you will feel a sort of sickness in high altitude commonly known as Acute Mountain Sickness. But with good planning, it can be easily avoided. AMS occurs as the result of a failure to adapt to higher altitudes. When fluid collects in the brain, you develop a headache, loss of appetite, nausea and sometimes vomiting. You become increasingly tired and want to lie down and do nothing. As you progress, you develop a problem with your balance and coordination (ataxia). Eventually you lie down and slip into coma. This syndrome is called High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE). HAPE and HACE can occur singly or in combination.

Do you provide any equipment while trekking?

On all our camping treks, we provide all the tents, sometimes dome tents, sometimes sturdy A frames and normally people share one tent between two; a foam mattress each; all the cutlery and utensils, cooking pots, stoves; candles/kerosene lantern, tables and stools, kitchen tent, dining tent and toilet tent; all the main meals while trekking but not snacks. On Tea house trek there is no necessity to provide any equipment.

How Should I dress during a trek?

The clothing you bring will need to allow for both the warmth of the days and the chill of the nights. While trekking during the day at lower altitudes, lightweight trekking trousers and T-shirts are recommended. It's always a good idea to carry a waterproof jacket and some warmer clothing with you though as mountain weather is notoriously unpredictable. For the cold nights, thermal underwear, a warm fleece jacket and even a down jacket will help to keep you warm. Good shoes are of great importance. They must be sturdy and comfortable. For higher altitude treks where you may have to tread snow for long hours, good boots are available for rent in Kathmandu. In view of local customs, try not to wear revealing clothes. Your reception by locals can vary greatly on the way you dress.

What is the best time for trekking?

The best time to trek is from September – December and February - May. The first three months of the dry season – October and November, when it is still comfortably warm – are ideal for trekking in Nepal. December, January and February are still good months for trekking, but it can be bitterly cold at high altitudes.


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